Online shoppers warned of extra costs if buying from outside the EU

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Galway Daily news Online shoppers warned of extra costs if buying from outside the EU

In the run up to the holiday season, people shopping online are being advised to be careful of additional charges when buying from outside the EU.

Online shopping, already massive, became far more prevalent during the pandemic and its lockdowns.

With Black Friday sales around the corner, and Christmas just beyond that, its expected that this will be an incredible busy time for people shopping and buying gifts online.

Ms Maureen Dalton for the Revenue Commissioners cautioned that, since Brexit, there will be “customs formalities” as well as additional charges in come cases when goods are coming from the UK.

“Also, since 1 July last, new VAT rules for goods arriving into Ireland from non-EU countries came into effect meaning that all such goods are subject to VAT regardless of their value.”

She advised people doing their shopping for Christmas or on Black Friday online to always check if the advertised price includes any additional costs or tax before buying.

“In some instances, the supplier may operate a duty paid model, where the total advertised price for the goods at the time of purchase includes Irish VAT and duties meaning no further Revenue charges will arise on delivery.”

“However, where this is not the case, the amount of VAT and any duties due will be payable when the goods arrive in Ireland. You will have to pay these charges to the postal service or parcel operator before the goods are delivered.”

Sometimes, when prices being advertised outside of the EU seem “attractively low”, that is because the vendor is not including tax and duty, she said.

A previous VAT exemption for imported goods from outside of the EU worth less than €22 ended in July of this year, meaning that a 23% VAT rate may now apply to the same items bought last year.

Goods worth over €150 will also attract Customs Duty when being shipped to Ireland.

Further information on tax and duty charges that may arise on goods bought online for personal use can be found on revenue.ie.