Fines double for 16 road traffic offences from today

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galway daily courts Fines double for 16 road traffic offences from today

Fines for 16 different road traffic offences such as speeding, using a mobile phone, or not having an L plate, have doubled from today.

Among the increased fines announced by Minister of State and Galway TD Hildegarde Naughton yesterday, speeding fines have doubled to €160, and the fine for holding a mobile phone has doubled to €120.

Minister Naughton made the announcement at the Road Safety Authority’s Annual Conference in Croke Park on Wednesday.

She also announced that three new Fixed Charge Notices will come into force in the new year.

These relate to the misuse of a disabled parking permit. Illegally parking in an electric charging bay and breaching a HGV ban and entering a specified public road without a valid permit.

The full list of the 16 speeding offences, and their increased fines in effect from today are:

Offence Within 28 days Within 56 days 3rd Payment Option
A learner permit holder driving a vehicle unaccompanied by a qualified person €160 €240 €320
Speeding €160 €240 €320
Failure to stop a vehicle for a school warden sign €160 €240 €320
Driving at speed exceeding that which will enable driver to stop vehicle within a distance driver can see to be clear  €160 €240 €320
A learner permit holder failing to display an L-plate or tabard while driving  €120 €180 €240
Holding a mobile phone while driving €120 €180 €240
Not wearing safety belt €120 €180 €240
Driver permitting person under specified age to occupy a seat when not wearing safety belt €120 €180 €240
Driver of car or goods vehicle permitting child under 3 years of age to travel in it without being restrained by appropriate child restraint €120 €180 €240
Driver of car or goods vehicle permitting child over 3 years of age to travel in it without being restrained by appropriate child restraint €120 €180 €240
Driver of car or goods vehicle permitting child to be restrained by rearward-facing child restraint fitted to a seat protected by active frontal air-bag €120 €180 €240
Not wearing safety belt or appropriate child restraint in specified category of vehicle €120 €180 €240
Using vehicle not equipped with a speed limitation device  €120 €180 €240
Using a vehicle equipped with a speed limitation device not complying with requirements in Regulation 4(5) (as amended by Regulation 2 of the European Communities (Installation and Use of Speed Limitation Devices in Motor Vehicle) (Amendment) Regulations 2006 ( S.I. No. 339 of 2006 )) of the European Communities (Installation and Use of Speed Limitation Devices in Motor Vehicles) Regulations 2005 ( S.I. No. 831 of 2005 ) €120 €180 €240
Failure by a novice driver to display an N-plate or tabard when driving in a public place  €120 €180 €240
Failing to stop a bicycle for a school warden stop sign €80 €120 €160

 

“As of today there have been 123 people killed on the road, an increase of 12 on this day last year, and compared to 2019,” Hildegarde Naughton said.

She added that over the Summer, she indicated an intention to review the penalties for road traffic offences, and increase fines for those that contribute to road deaths.

“Last week I signed the necessary regulations, which will double the fixed charge penalty for a total of 16 high-risk driving offences including speeding, use of a mobile phone while driving, failure to wear a seatbelt or use an appropriate child restraint, and unaccompanied learner driving.”

“These fines have not increased since they were introduced, in some cases almost 20 years ago. Increasing fines for road offences will act as a stronger deterrent to those who choose to break our lifesaving rules of the road.”

Ms Liz O’Donnell, Chairperson of the RSA, said that speed continues to be a significant factor to fatal collision in Ireland.

“Analysis of Irish Coronial data shows that one quarter of driver fatalities with a record of their actions available were exceeding a safe speed.”

She added that RSA research found that one third of drivers admit to exceeding 50km/hr speed limits by at least 10km/hr, while half admit to going over €100km/hr speed limits.